1. allabouteva:

After a brief hiatus, we’re back! Back with a 3D geometric color-blocked necklace, as shown with supporting guests Snarkitecture inside the foamiest exhibition Storefront has ever seen. 
[Hat tip to Biodebop, via email.]

    allabouteva:

    After a brief hiatus, we’re back! Back with a 3D geometric color-blocked necklace, as shown with supporting guests Snarkitecture inside the foamiest exhibition Storefront has ever seen. 

    [Hat tip to Biodebop, via email.]

  2. w-zw:

Satellite photo of feedlot waste lagoon

    w-zw:

    Satellite photo of feedlot waste lagoon

  3. I consider 99 percent of modern architecture to be boring, banal and barren.

    — James Stirling, “On Modernism,” c. 1980 (via cca)

  4. At a party in the apartment of the New York architect Paul Rudolph, he chose to express himself by urinating against its huge window, from the terrace outside, facing into the crowd of guests.”

    (Rowan Moore, James Stirling: Visionary Architect, And a Very Naughty Boy, The Guardian.)

    (Source: theguardian.com)

  5. denimnfriend:

Playboy, July 1961

    denimnfriend:

    Playboy, July 1961

  6. voxsart:

The Coat And Tie Crowd.
Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, and Ernesto Rogers, 1950.

    voxsart:

    The Coat And Tie Crowd.

    Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, and Ernesto Rogers, 1950.

  7. The first treatise on the interior of the body, which is to say, the treatise that gave the body an interior , written by Henri De Mondeville in the fourteenth century, argues that the body is a house, the house of the soul, which like any house can only be maintained as such by constant surveillance of its openings. The woman’s body is seen as an inadequate enclosure because its boundaries are convoluted. While it is made of the same material as a man’s body, it has ben turned inside out. Her house has been disordered, leaving its walls full of openings. Consequently, she must always occupy a second house, a building to protect her soul. Gradually this sense of vulnerability to the exterior was extended to all bodies which were then subjected to a kind of supervision traditionally given to the woman. The classical argument about her lack of self-control had been generalized.” 

    Mark Wigley, writing in Sexuality & Space, Ed. Beatriz Colomina. p. 358

  8. "Le Corbusier was a man of apparently absolute precision in everything he did, from his obsessive timekeeping to the organisation of his own death. That strange episode opens the book. Le Corbusier simply swam himself to death, believing that if he went on for long enough his failing heart would give out, allowing him to drown in the place and at the time of his choosing. It did. The business of dying (too early? too late?) was a constant preoccupation. ”

    (London Review of Books)

    (Source: lrb.co.uk)

  9. "Nothing in his firm’s dingy 11th-floor offices at an unglamorous Midtown Manhattan address seems at all chic. Books and magazines stuffed into gray metal shelves are everywhere; associates in T-shirts and sneakers stare at computers that have seen better days. A withered plant stands next to the window in the conference room."

    (Departures - Peter’s Game Plan)

    (Source: departures.com)

  10. image

    Do you know anything about football?” Rushman asked. The 74-year-old Eisenman, famous for high-concept projects such as Berlin’s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, replied that he did, in fact, know a few things about the sport. He explained how he spends Sundays every fall sitting in the nosebleed section of Giants Stadium drinking beer and eating hot dogs while cheering on his beloved team. Then he named the 1947 Chicago Cardinals backfield. He won the job a week later.

    To make sure every fan gets a great view, Eisenman designed the twin trusses that support the stadium’s roof so that neither one obscures the field from the upper rows. Even the concourse is fan-centric. At most stadiums, the walkways and concession stands are on the exterior, away from the action, but Eisenman set it up so that the entire concourse has a view of the field. He can get his hot dog and not miss a play. “Because I’m an architect and a football fan,” he explains, “I didn’t want the architecture to get in the way of the football.”

    (Popular Science)

    (Source: popsci.com)

  11. (Source: pda.arch.unige.it)

  12. catrinastewart:

    Le Corbusier’s custom copy of Don Quixote was bound in the fur of his beloved dog Pinceau.

    From the book Le Corbusier: Architect of Books